NewseumED: resources for teaching the 1st Amendment

If you are looking for resources to teach youth about the 1st Amendment, take some time to explore the free website NewseumED, produced by the Newseum, a museum dedicated to news in Washington DC. Once registered, a user has complete access to a library of primary sources, artifacts, videos, over two hundred lesson plans,  historic front pages of newspapers, timelines, and maps. Resources can be shared with a url, and lessons, which are aligned to the NCSS, NCTE and the Common Core, can be downloaded and copied.

The NewseumED website states, “Our approach begins with using the First Amendment as a springboard to illuminate the challenges and ideals of our democracy and to cultivate the skills needed to make informed decisions in a diverse and demanding world.”

If you are looking for units to teach on freedom of the press and interpreting the news, try their Media Literacy Booster Pack. Or perhaps you are you looking for a teaching unit to explore how the suffragists embraced the First Amendment as a tool to help achieve passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920.

If you are looking for MLK and Black History month resources, or how to identify and navigate “Fake News” , or you want to teach about the Supreme Court case that protected student speech in public schools, there is truly more exceptional material than you could ever use on the NewseumED website.

For an in-depth tutorial on the NewseumED website, watch the video below.

 

Register to Vote!

“The pace of new voter registrations among young people in crucial states is accelerating,” writes Michael Tackett and Rachel Shorey in Young People Keep Marching After Parkland, This Time to Register to Vote.  And, they write, “[Youth]  could even help shape the outcome of the midterm elections. If voters in their teens and 20s vote in greater numbers than usual… the groundswell could affect close races in key states like Arizona and Florida, where there will be competitive races for governor, the Senate and a number of House districts in November.”

It is essential that we teach our youth not only the importance of voting to uphold a democracy, but also how to register and how to vote.

There are many resources available to help educate and register our youth to vote. The youth activist group March For Our Lives has an online toolkit.  USA.gov offers information about laws and registration as well as information on how to vote. And even sites like Wikihow have information on how to vote in the United States. There is no shortage of information.

According to PBS, Only 58% of all eligible voters voted in the 2016 election, yet voting is one of the foundations of a strong democracy. We need to teach our youth the importance of voting and the process.

 

 

 

Democracy and Social Justice

“Democracy is not a state. It is not some high plateau that we struggle to reach so we can finally settle down to rest. Democracy is an act. It is an act that requires participation, organization and dedication to the highest principles. It is an act, and a series of actions that require us to continuously verify our commitment to civil rights and social justice at every challenge.”Rep. John Lewis Reflections on a Dream Deferred

It is 2018, and seemingly now more than ever, our nation is rediscovering the true meaning of our fragile democracy. It is the American classroom perhaps, that now finds itself at the center of the fight for social justice, for it is there that teachers find themselves inundated daily with the need to undo the social damage caused by the ignorant words and deeds of our current politicians. Our classrooms are at the front lines as our students try to make sense of things our political leaders say, and it is our collective responsibility to help our youth learn how to come to their own understandings, find the truth through research, and articulate their own political and social views. As Rep. John Lewis writes, “Democracy is an act…that requires participation, organization and dedication to the highest principles.”

Not just on Martin Luther King day, but everyday, our classrooms need to teach and model the connection between democracy and social justice.  We must ask the essential question: How  is standing up against racism and injustice a democratic obligation? And we must model this connection through our own actions, our treatment of those in our school-wide communities, and also in the curriculum we design for our youth.

“Now I realize that there are those all over who are telling us that we must slow up. … But we cannot afford to slow up. We have a moral obligation to press on. We have our self-respect to maintain. But even more we can’t afford to slow up because of our love for America and our love for the democratic way of life. … We must keep moving. We must keep going.”
–Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
From “The Montgomery Story,” an address to the 47th annual NAACP Convention, San Francisco, June 27, 1956

For resources on Martin Luther King, Jr. visit the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute at Stanford University, where you can find  papers, documents and video, a liberation curriculum, as well as  a collection of lesson plans for teachers of all grade levels.

Or try one of the 8 extension activities from this lesson: Dr King and the Movement from Teaching Tolerance for a unique way to explore, celebrate and question the progress made since Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.